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Thawing and Cooking

Thawing and Cooking

Greensbury Market recommends defrosting meats in the refrigerator overnight in their original sealed packages. For best results, keep refrigerated in the original sealed package and use within five days.

Greensbury Market's meats are also great cooked directly from your freezer, using a slightly lower temperature. See cooking techniques for ideas on how to prepare your Greensbury beef.

  1. Pan Searching Basics
  2. Grilling Basics
  3. Broiling Basics
  4. Braising Basics
  5. Pan Frying Basics

Pan Searching Basics

About Pan Searing:    

You will need a good exhaust fan over your stove for this cooking technique, because it produces quite a bit of smoke. Pan searing works best for thinner cuts of meat. If your steaks are more than one-inch thick, we recommend grilling. Alternatively, preheat the oven to 500 °F and set a rack on the lowest rung. Start your steaks as you would for pan searing, but after putting them in the hot pan immediately transfer them to the oven. Timing remains the same as describing below.    

How to Pan Sear:    

  1. Set a large cast iron or heavy sauté pan (big enough not to crowd the steaks) over high heat. Let it preheat until smoking hot, about 3-4 minutes.

  2. Pat the steaks dry with paper towels.

  3. Coat the bottom of the pan sparingly with vegetable oil and add the steaks.

  4. Turn the steaks only once during cooking, to give them time to brown nicely.
  5. For one-inch medium-rare steaks, cook for about 4 minutes per side. Adjust time for size of steak and desired doneness.

  6. The most foolproof way to test a steak for doneness is to use an instant read thermometer.

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Grilling Basics

About grilling:

Grilling is an ideal way to prepare flavorful thick-cut steaks that look as good as they taste.

How to grill: 

  1. Let steaks sit at room temperature for about 20 minutes before grilling.

  2. Clean the rack for the grill thoroughly.  

  3. To prepare your charcoal grill, make a medium-hot charcoal fire. You can test it by holding your hand above it. When the coals are hot, enough you will have to move your hand away after 2-3 seconds. (To prepare a gas grill, use a medium-hot temperature, and allow grill to heat up until it passes the above test.)

  4. Set the rack for the grill 3-4 inches from the fire. 

  5. Pat the steaks dry with paper towels. 

  6. Turn the steaks only once during cooking, to give them time to brown nicely. 

  7. For one-inch medium-rare thick steaks, cook for about 4 minutes per side. Adjust time for size of steak and desired doneness. 

  8. The most foolproof way to test a steak for doneness is to use an instant read thermometer.

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Broiling Basics

About broiling:

Broiling is basically up-side-down grilling. A high-heat oven can produce delicious, browned steaks.

How to broil:

  1. Let steaks sit at room temperature for about 20 minutes before broiling.  

  2. Preheat your broiler thoroughly and to its highest setting. 

  3. Always broil on a rack, so that the melted fat does not build up on the pan and catch fire.

  4. Position the broiler rack so that your steak cooks 3-4 inches from the heat source.

  5. Pat the steaks dry with paper towels.

  6. Turn the steaks only once, giving them time to brown nicely on each side. (If your broiler is not intense enough to brown both sides, do not turn the meat at all.)

  7. For one-inch medium-rare thick steaks, cook for about 4 minutes per side. Adjust time  for size of steak and desired doneness.

  8. The most foolproof way to test a steak for doneness is to use an instant read thermometer.

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Braising Basics

About braising:

Braising is simply cooking very slowly in liquid. Stews, daubes and ragouts are all braised, as is chili made with chunks of meat. Braising is a great way to make a flavorful but less tender piece of meat meltingly tender. Our top sirloin is excellent grilled or pan seared and then thinly sliced, but it could also be braised whole as a delicious pot roast, or cut into chunks for an amazing stew. While it is not absolutely necessary to sear the meat before adding the liquid, it will add an extra layer of incredible flavor to a braised dish if do. There are lots of choices for braised dishes: the cooking liquid, the herbs and spices, whether or not to use garlic, onion, tomato, lemon, etc. The slow, covered process allows all the ingredients to blend and intensify.

How to braise:  

Brown the meat in a very hot pan with a little bit of vegetable oil. Then add the liquid and simmer the meat slowly until it is very tender (do not boil).

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Pan Frying Basics

About pan frying:

Pan frying is a flexible technique for beef, chicken or pork.

How to pan fry:

  1. If you are cooking meat more than 1 1/2 inches thick, preheat the oven to 375° F.

  2. Choose a heavy, good quality sauté pan that is big enough to hold your beef, chicken breasts, sausages or chops without crowding them.

  3. Pat the meat dry with paper towels. For an extra crusty surface you may dredge chicken breasts or chops lightly in all-purpose flour, patting off excess.

  4. Set the pan over medium-high heat for about 1 minute. Coat the bottom of the pan lightly with vegetable oil or light olive oil. Put the meat in the pan and let it cook until nicely browned on each side, about 2-3 minutes. 

  5. If you are cooking sausage or something thinner than 1 1/2 inches, you may reduce the heat under the pan and finish the cooking on top of the stove. For thicker cuts, finish the cooking in a 375° F oven.  (Time will vary depending on the type of meat and thickness.)  If you are finishing the cooking in the oven, either put the sauté pan in the oven—only if the handle is metal—or transfer the meat to a sheet pan.

  6. The most foolproof way to test meat for doneness is to use an instant read thermometer.

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